NYT Wordle today — answer and hints for game #1,013, Thursday, March 28 - YoP BUZZ NEWS

NYT Wordle today — answer and hints for game #1,013, Thursday, March 28

Today’s Wordle answer is a lot easier than recent puzzles. According to the New York Times’ WordleBot, the average player completes Wordle #1,013 in 3.4 moves in easy mode or 3.3 if playing by hard rules.

Each day, we will update this article with Wordle hints and tips to help you find today’s answer. And if the hints aren’t enough, we’ll even give you the answer, in case you’re really stuck or just haven’t had time to complete today’s puzzle. Plus, we are also including an analysis of yesterday’s puzzle, #1,012, in case you’re reading this in a different time zone.

So be warned: spoilers lie ahead for game #1,013. Only read on if you want to know today’s Wordle answer!

Using one of the greatest Wordle start words for each game you play is our first piece of advice. However, here are some more precise hints for today’s Wordle answer if you’re looking for them:

Two of the five vowels are present.*
Not a single letter is repeated.
The top five Wordle letters consist of two characters. We define vowels as A, E, I, O, and U. Depending on how they are used, certain other letters can also be regarded as vowels.

These pointers ought to help you find today’s Wordle solution at least partially. If not, continue reading for more significant hints; alternatively, if you’re just interested in the solution, go on to the next section.

Now for a more detailed hint: Using its words is the solution for today’s Wordle.

The answer to Wordle #1,013 starts with S, so combined with the hints above you should now have all the clues you need to get the answer and not break a Wordle streak. 

OK, it’s now time to scroll down for the answer…

So, what is today’s Wordle answer for game #1,013?

Drumroll, please — it’s SPEAK.

Hi everyone who uses words. A simple and pleasant one for you today. ‘E’ and ‘A’, the two most common Wordle letters, are found in the word SPEAK, which is used frequently by most people.

That implied that my ORATE opener promptly turned both yellow. That’s not as helpful, though, as their combined presence still leaves a whopping 126 potential answers open. They are both so common.

Today, a large number of WordleBot’s top Wordle start words were more effective. PLATE reduces the number of potential solutions to 15 while PLANE leaves 17. There would only be two options left if you played LAPSE.

I aim to test a mix of ‘I’, ‘N’, ‘S’, ‘C’ and ‘L’ on my second turn if possible, and today SNEAK allowed me to try two of them.

Surprisingly, four turned green, including the letter I wasn’t looking to test: ‘K’.

The word had to be S?EAK, and that only left one possible answer. I typed in SPEAK and completed the puzzle in three turns.

Hopefully you did well today, Wordlers. See you tomorrow.

Reading this in a later time zone? The Wordle answer for game #1,012 was STUNG.

Hello Wordlers. An easier one than the last couple, for sure. ‘S’, ‘T’ and ‘N’ are all common letters, and with no other vowels, you should have ‘U’ pretty quickly too.

I began with ORATE, my favorite start word as it contains all five of the most common Wordle letters. Today it only turned up a single yellow ‘T’, which left me with 77 possible answers to choose from.

Most of WordleBot’s best Wordle start words were similar or even worse, but there were a few good exceptions. STRIP leaves 37 answers, while TRAIN drops that to 31. If you played PRINT, just 13 options would remain.

I usually try to mix ‘I’, ‘N’, ‘S’, ‘C’ and ‘L’ around my confirmed yellow and green characters on my second turn, but with no vowels I wanted to prioritize ‘U’ as well.

UNTIL did that nicely, and it was extremely effective, turning ‘U’ and ‘N’ yellow while ruling out ‘T’ in a second spot. Just four possible solutions remained, according to WordleBot*.

On my next go, I decided to play STUNT. This was risky with two ‘T’s, but it would mix up my existing letters and guarantee me some greens.

In fact, it gave me four: everything but the second ‘T’ turned green, proving the word had to be STUN?.

I typed in STUNG and completed the puzzle in four turns.

Hopefully you did well today, Wordlers. See you tomorrow.

* These were STUNG, STUNT, STUNK and SHUNT.

If you’re looking for a list of older Wordle answers, we can also help. Here’s a list going back 20 games.

  • Wordle #1,012: STUNG
  • Wordle #1,011: MAYOR
  • Wordle #1,010: SALLY
  • Wordle #1,009: TOWEL
  • Wordle #1,008: RISEN
  • Wordle #1,007: DECAY
  • Wordle #1,006: SHADE
  • Wordle #1,005: LINGO
  • Wordle #1,004: ABIDE
  • Wordle #1,003: SPELT
  • Wordle #1,002: SNORT
  • Wordle #1,001: TOXIN
  • Wordle #1,000: ERUPT
  • Wordle #999: SINCE
  • Wordle #998: LOCAL
  • Wordle #997: HEAVE
  • Wordle #996: PESKY
  • Wordle #995: GRASP
  • Wordle #994: CHEER
  • Wordle #993: EARLY

The best tip I can give is to use one of the best Wordle start words. I can’t stress this enough — it makes a massive difference.

Without one, you’ll be scrabbling around in the dark trying (and possibly failing) to find the right five letters (or possibly fewer) out of the 26 possibles. But clever people (not me) have done the math and identified the best start words based on both frequency in English and frequency among Wordle answers. So use them! 

Secondly, think about combinations, especially at the start and end. Some options are far more common than others — for instance, SH, ST, CR and CH all feature frequently. 

Vowels obviously need consideration too: not all Wordle answers will contain more than one, but plenty do, and some even have three. A good Wordle start word should have used a couple, but if they don’t feature you might well want to try another one or two on your next go. Plus, remember the Y — this sometimes acts as a surrogate vowel, and is easy to forget. It also appears at the end of plenty of words.

Finally, try out possibilities. So long as you don’t press ‘Enter’ you can try possible answers to see how they look on screen. Put in likely letters plus any you know are definitely in the word, then mentally change one to the other available options. This technique has worked for me multiple times, and it’s particularly helpful when the word in question is not an obvious one (like FJORD or ISLET). 

But if you’re still struggling with Wordle, check out how Tom’s Guide’s Wordle experts have honed their strategy after playing a lot of Wordle after it first launched.

We also have plenty of Wordle tips and tricks to share, like how we’ve analyzed every Wordle answer used to look for trends and have some further advice for you there. And if you’re new to the game you should also take a look at our What is Wordle? guide.

The best tip I can give is to use one of the best Wordle start words. I can’t stress this enough — it makes a massive difference.

Without one, you’ll be scrabbling around in the dark trying (and possibly failing) to find the right five letters (or possibly fewer) out of the 26 possibles. But clever people (not me) have done the math and identified the best start words based on both frequency in English and frequency among Wordle answers. So use them! 

Secondly, think about combinations, especially at the start and end. Some options are far more common than others — for instance, SH, ST, CR and CH all feature frequently. 

Vowels obviously need consideration too: not all Wordle answers will contain more than one, but plenty do, and some even have three. A good Wordle start word should have used a couple, but if they don’t feature you might well want to try another one or two on your next go. Plus, remember the Y — this sometimes acts as a surrogate vowel, and is easy to forget. It also appears at the end of plenty of words.

Finally, try out possibilities. So long as you don’t press ‘Enter’ you can try possible answers to see how they look on screen. Put in likely letters plus any you know are definitely in the word, then mentally change one to the other available options. This technique has worked for me multiple times, and it’s particularly helpful when the word in question is not an obvious one (like FJORD or ISLET). 

But if you’re still struggling with Wordle, check out how Tom’s Guide’s Wordle experts have honed their strategy after playing a lot of Wordle after it first launched.

We also have plenty of Wordle tips and tricks to share, like how we’ve analyzed every Wordle answer used to look for trends and have some further advice for you there. And if you’re new to the game you should also take a look at our What is Wordle? guide.

Wordle officially launched in October 2021, but actually started in June of that year and celebrated its first birthday on June 19, 2022. (You can read my thoughts on the 5 things Wordle needs to improve if it’s to keep us playing for its third year.)

However, it only grew in popularity towards the end of the year, then went viral in January as the world woke up to its charms. In fact, it proved so successful that The New York Times bought Wordle for a seven-figure sum in early February and the game is now part of NYT Games.

It’s played via the NYT Games website here, and is entirely free. Both the NYT and the game’s creator, Josh Wardle, have stated that it will remain free. Some people think that Wordle has got harder since the NYT takeover, but it really hasn’t.

Wordle is a simple game in which your challenge is to guess a five-letter word in six attempts. Each time you guess, you’re told which of your chosen letters are in the target word, and whether they are in the right place. 

If a letter is in the correct place, it turns green. If it’s in the word but in the wrong place, it turns yellow. And if it’s not in the word at all, it turns gray.

There’s just one puzzle a day, and everyone completes the same one. It resets at midnight each day. You’ll find more information about the game in our What is Wordle? article.

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